Chest Compression Alone CPR is Associated with Better Long-Term Survival Compared to Standard CPR

Background

Little is known about the long-term survival effects of type-specific bystander CPR in the community. We hypothesized that dispatcher instruction consisting of chest compression alone would be associated with better overall long-term prognosis compared to chest compression plus rescue breathing.

Methods and Results

The investigation was a retrospective cohort study that combined 2 randomized trials comparing the short-term survival effects of dispatcher CPR instruction consisting either of chest compression alone or chest compression plus rescue breathing. Longterm vital status was ascertained using the respective National and State death records through 31st July 2011. We performed Kaplan Meier method and Cox regression to evaluate survival according to the type of CPR instruction. Of the 2496 subjects included in the current investigation, randomized deaths and 236 long-term survivors. Randomization to chest compression alone compared to chest compression plus rescue breathing was associated with a lower risk of death after adjustment for potential confounders (adjusted HR=0.91; 95% CI [0.83-0.99], p=0.02).

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Conclusions

The findings provide strong support for long-term mortality benefit of dispatcher CPR instruction strategy consisting of chest compression alone rather than chest compression plus rescue breathing among adult cardiac arrest patients requiring dispatcher assistance.

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